Sunday, November 12, 2017

Anouar Brahem - Blue Maqams (ECM Records, 2017)

This is an interesting album of jazz/world fusion made by a classy band consisting of Anouar Brahem on oud, Dave Holland on bass, Jack DeJohnette on drums and percussion and Django Bates piano. They make a smooth as silk sound that is comparable to music that bands like Codona and Oregon made for ECM in the 1970's. Brahem is originally from Tunisia, but is based mostly in France and he gets an appealingly warm tone from his instrument, which isn't used all that often in jazz, apart from the Lebanese born Rabih Abou-Khalil. The album starts out in excellent fashion with the track "Opening Day" with the subtle oud setting an exotic foundation for the music, followed by DeJohnette's subtle percussion primarily on cymbals. The oud has a character or quality of musical sound that is distinct from that of a guitar, and it fits in well with the remaining instruments, especially Bates' gentle and spacious piano which allows the music to ebb and flow in a graceful manner. "Bahia" also opens with unaccompanied oud, resonating in open space, along with subtle vocalization. After about two and a half minutes the remainder of the band gradually enters, with beautiful bass playing from Holland acting as the perfect counterweight to the other stringed instrument. DeJohnette plays a very light and nimble rhythm that suits the music very well, while Bates seems to sit out for most of the track. Silence frames the opening of "Bom Dia Rio" as Brahem carefully plucks out quiet notes and places them carefully in the open space. After a couple of minutes, the keyboard, bass and drums enter, filling out the sound nicely, but never overwhelming it. Bates frames the music with well articulated notes and chords, while Holland and DeJohnette engage Brahem directly. The group develops a fine full band improvisation that has a delicate and precise groove that provides the forward motion. Bates' cascade of notes are capable of making fine distinctions within the music, and Holland steps out for a very impressive bass solo which is delicately complex and understated. Brahem solos over the bass and drums, making use of clever and indirect methods to achieve success, with a sound that is sharp or penetrating, while perceive or recognizing his role in the music. This was a very interesting album and a fine example of how jazz and world music can successfully collaborate and draw inspiration from one another. Blue Maqams - amazon.com

Send comments to Tim.