Monday, November 13, 2017

Ivo Perelman with Matthew Shipp and Jeff Cosgrove - Baltimore (Leo Records, 2017)

The lucky audience members who were in attendance at An Die Musik in Baltimore, Maryland on June 25, 2017, saw a particularly fulfilling performance from tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman, pianist Matthew Shipp and drummer Jeff Cosgrove. Considering the quality of excellent music that Perelman has released this year, that is really saying something. This album consists of an uninterrupted fifty-one minute collective improvisation simply called “Second Set” that is absolutely thrilling to listen to with each member of the trio going all out to spontaneously create very exciting and potent music in real time. Perelman has one of the most immediately recognizable tenor saxophone tones in modern jazz, recalling the bold swaths of sound that were once employed by Albert Ayler and and the early recordings of Gato Barbieri, he can move from a whisper to a scream, and his ability to pace himself and develop a form and narrative seemingly out of thin air is one of his most impressive attributes. Pianist Matthew Shipp has been a frequent improvising partner and foil of Perelman’s, and it is easy to understand why they work so well together. Shipp makes use of the whole breadth and width of the piano, and he makes up for the lack of a traditional bass player on this album by adding blasts of low end piano chords which provide depth and structural integrity to the music, while also stretch out to add gentle chords when the music opens up, allowing light and space to flood into the proceedings. Jeff Cosgrove has made a couple of albums with Shipp in the past but this may be his first encounter with Perelman and he acquits himself to music very well, playing a rippling rhythmic current that fits in very well, switching between blistering stick playing and subtle brushwork in a nimble fashion. These three musicians take all of these qualities and combine them in a collective improvisation that flows naturally and organically, enveloping sections of blistering free jazz and juxtaposing them against some soft and velvety areas which are moderate in tone and effect, creating an interesting departure from the harsh or severe portions of the performance. This was an excellent album and one of the highlights of Perelman’s most productive year, because the musicians use the language of jazz and free improvisation to codify their sound in distinctive and impressive fashion. Baltimore - amazon.com

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