Monday, December 04, 2017

Ivo Perelman - Heptagon (Leo Records, 2017)

Heptagon is an excellent quartet album of stellar modern jazz led by tenor saxophonist Ivo Perelman in the company of Matthew Shipp on piano, William Parker on bass and Bobby Kapp on drums which was recorded in Brooklyn NY during May of 2017. All of these musicians are well known to each other and they jump into this collectively improvised album with no fear, developing a crisp seven part, forty-five minute album that moves through a wide range of tempos and feelings from the blistering free jazz of "Part 1" which has the quartet locked in together and navigating an exciting and very fast paced performance with Perelman's raw and powerful saxophone leading the charge. Kapp is perfectly suited for the music at hand, dancing across the cymbals and adding just the right touch of rhythmic sensibility to the music. Shipp and Parker are longtime Perelman confidants, showing their ease with the graceful and flowing "Part 2" which has crystalline piano chords and longing bowed bass that add an emotionally charged aspect to the music, leading to a performance that is mysterious and thought provoking. Journalist Neil Tesser writes in this album's liner notes about the concept of lyricism in Perelman's work and that is underscored here with long peals of wounded saxophone and arcs of bowed bass create a deep seated beauty within the music. Shipp's percussive and insistent piano work provides the momentum for "Part 3" and the scouring bass and light percussion are the perfect foil for Perelman's deep yearning saxophone tones, and he uses this finely honed technique to build to a towering conclusion of harrowing intensity, rising to impassioned squalls from the highest range of his instrument, using this raw and rending tone to build the music to a natural and organic conclusion. The music on this album develops further the deeper it goes, with the music pouring forth like a planned suite of tunes rather than a spontaneously improvised collection. Kapp is able to deftly switch to brushes for the intimate opening of "Part 5" which combines the risk taking free improvisation these musicians are known for with a textural and woven structure which is all the more impressive when you consider that it was constructed on the fly and played with an impressive combination of close attention to detail and devil may care spontaneity. The searing saxophone leads the band through to the conclusion of the album, making for a complete and constructive whole, and one of the most finely realized of the albums that Perelman has released this year. It's a gem, and open eared modern jazz fans shouldn't miss it. Heptagon - amazon.com

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