Thursday, December 07, 2017

Kjetil Møster / Jeff Parker / Joshua Abrams / John Herndon - Ran Do (Clean Feed, 2017)

This is a very interesting cooperative band consisting of Kjetil Moster on tenor saxophone, Jeff Parker on guitar, Joshua Abrams on bass and John Herndon on drums. The quartet was born out of Moster’s encounter with the talented Chicago music community, after a tour made by his band Møster in the United States. At this time he came into contact with members of that city's thriving and exploratory jazz and post-rock scenes. The music on this album is quite varied and interesting, incorporating aspects of abstract free improvisation and blazing free funk that wouldn't sound out of place on an early seventies Miles Davis recording. That part of their playing is most noticeable on the opening track "Orko" where the band comes out swaggering with snarling guitar, propulsive bass and drums and scouring saxophone. The develop large slabs of energy that moves around the soundascape of the performance, opening a wide field of view and incorporating blocks of guitar, raw bass and vital drumming that create a very strong rhythmic setting which is perfect for Moster's stoic saxophone playing and improvising. It's not all like that, and this heavy and bracing form of music is juxtaposed by "Annica" where the group takes a unique approach to the ballad form with Herndon making inventive use of brushes and open ended percussion techniques, while Moster plays light and breathy saxophone that moves between melody and abstraction, keeping everyone on their toes. They are framed by subtle guitar and bass which keeps everything within the frame and provides context for their ever evolving improvisation. It is also the longest track on the album unfolding in a dream like pattern, clocking in at over fifteen minutes, and providing plenty of time for the band members to explore the developing and morphing space and time that opens before them. This admirable sense of restraint carries on into the final track, "Pajama Jazz" which shows the group incorporating some swinging modern jazz into their musical vocabulary, and this allows them to provide further textures that are available for exploration, and it is the collective improvisation that develops out of this that is most impressive with everyone turning their shoulder to the wheel and creating a memorable performance. This was a rewarding album of modern jazz and an excellent cross-pollination of ideas between the fertile Scandinavian and Chicago jazz scenes. Incorporating ideas from post-rock of groups like Motorpsycho and Tortoise as well as the arena of post-bop and fusion jazz allows the group to have a wide arena of possibilities to explore, and they make the most of it. Ran Do - amazon.com

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